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German States, duchy of Jülich, Reinald IV, modern silver reproduction imitating a gold coin of the Jülich mint struck 1414-17 AD., Gulden, cf. Friedberg 1364.

Germany, German States, duchy of Jülich, Reinald IV, Duke of Guelders and Jülich (1402-1423), modern reproduction imitating the Jülich mint, no date, (original pieces struck 1414-17 AD.), repro ca. 1970-2000 AD.,
Gulden reproduction (ø 22,5 mm / 5,00 g), 0,925 silver (genuine pieces: gold), axes irregular alignment ↑↖ (ca. 320°), plain edge,
Obv.: + RЄIn DVX. - IVL GЄL Є O Z' / N/925 , Saint John standing facing - der hl. Johannes stehend von vorn.
Rev.: MOnЄ. - .TA: DЄ. - .IVLIA. , divided shield of arms at center, three smaller ones around in lobes - gespaltener Schild Jülich/Geldern im gespitzten Dreipass, innen in dessen Winkeln drei kleine Wappenschilder.
cf. Felke 927 ; - Noss 156 ; - Friedberg 1364 .

The Duchy of Jülich (German: Herzogtum Jülich; Dutch: Hertogdom Gulik; French: Duché de Juliers) comprised a state within the Holy Roman Empire from the 11th to the 18th centuries. The duchy lay left of the Rhine river between the Electorate of Cologne in the east and the Duchy of Limburg in the west. It had territories on both sides of the river Rur, around its capital Jülich – the former Roman Iuliacum – in the lower Rhineland. The duchy amalgamated with the County of Berg beyond the Rhine in 1423, and from then on also became known as Jülich-Berg.

Reinald IV, Duke of Guelders and Jülich aka Reginald IV (c. 1365 – 25 June 1423) was the son of William II, Duke of Jülich and Maria of Guelders, daughter of Reinald II, Duke of Guelders.
Reinald IV became the second Duke of Guelders and Jülich upon his brother William's death in 1402 without heirs. Reinald, in conjunction with the Wittelsbach Counts of Holland, Hainaut and Zeeland, tried in vain to slow the emergence of Burgundy in the Netherlands area and in 1406 was unable to enforce old claims against Burgundy to Brabant-Limburg. He allied himself with Rupert, King of Germany, supporting his coronation in Aachen and remained closely connected with the House of Orléans. In 1407, Reinald supported his brother-in-law, John of Arkel, against the Dutch and in 1409 received the city of Gorinchem from John. This started a new feud with Holland which ended in 1412 when Reinald ceded Gorinchem for a large sum of money. He also conceded the city of Emmerich as a result of an earlier promise to the Duke of Cleves. Reinald led the traditional feuds of his House, particularly those against the Bishops of Utrecht and against Holland and Friesland. He occupied Arkel, but in 1422 he was forced to seek peace and return all of his conquests. Reinald also stood against the House of Cleves in the Niederrhein area and maintained a lot of influence over Guelders.
On 5 May 1405, Reinald married Marie of Harcourt, daughter of John VI, Count of Harcourt.
Reinald died near Arnhem on 25 June 1423 and was buried at Kloster Monkhuizen.
As Reinald died without legitimate issue, the Duchy of Jülich descended to Adolf, Duke of Berg, son of Reinald's cousin William VII of Jülich, 1st Duke of Berg. In 1426, Reinald's widow married Adolf's son Rupert, but he died in 1431 without heirs and the Duchy of Jülich-Berg then descended to Adolf's nephew Gerhard.
The Duchy of Guelders descended to Reinald's great-nephew, Arnold of Egmond, although the House of Jülich fought unsuccessfully against the House of Egmond for this title.

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Filename:IulitReprst.jpg
Album name:Arminius / Fakes, reproductions and fantasies of medieval til contemporary types
Keywords:German / States / Germany / Duchy / Jülich / Reinald / Reproduction / Imitation / Gulden / Saint / John / Shield / Arms / Lobe
Filesize:422 KiB
Date added:Oct 31, 2014
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URL:http://www.arminius-numismatics.com/coppermine1414/cpg1414/displayimage.php?pid=12069
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